Brunei and its inhabitants

Brunei sultan gardens

Brunei sultan gardens

Sultan’s Palace can not be visited without a special invitation. It has 1788 rooms, a hall for celebrations for 4,000 people, more than 200 toilets, etc. For certain holidays, the Sultan invites his guests to the palace and on departure they receive a “royal gift” – a golden home watch for the memory of the visit. All of this wealth the sultan owes to the vast reserves and extraction of oil and gas that is exported to many countries. New large deposits have recently been found on the state’s shelf.The country’s climate is humid equatorial with average temperatures around 26ºC. This is the reason why more than 2/3 of the territory is covered with dense dense forests and along the coasts the mangrove forests are spread. Precipitation is about 2000 mm per year, the maximum is in the local summer – from June to September.

Oil and gas exports account for more than 95% of the country’s financial revenues. Agriculture is underdeveloped – rice, coconut palm, bananas, mango, rubber wood, cocoa, potatoes are grown, but almost 4/5 of the food is imported. Brunei has territory in Australia, which is larger than the country itself. There is a stock of livestock that is transported alive to the Sultan, so that people always have fresh meat. The Sultan has also bought land in Thailand, where the rice supplies come from.

Brunei Great Mosque

Brunei Great Mosque

If one of the citizens of the state decides to do business, he / she sends a request accompanied by an estimate of the financial resources necessary for the development of this business and receives a reply and a corresponding grant from the Sultan within a certain period of time. But we should not envy those people who otherwise have a rather boring life, are not much interested in what’s going on in the world, they’re watching one of the most uninteresting televisions I’ve seen, the bars are limited, alcohol is forbidden Qur’an, travel rarely outside the country, but it is important to be loyal to the Sultan, and then everything is fine.

The Great Mosque – a symbol of the capital

The richness of Brunei is due to the huge deposits of oil and natural gas. Capital Bendar Serri Begvan is a modern city, extremely quiet with very low traffic. Its population is approx. 50 thousand inhabitants. He can tour for a day, along with all the many museums. Among them, the most remarkable is the museum, which presents the Sultan’s gifts from his visits to the whole world and the guests of the Sultanate – extremely interesting works of art from different countries. The biggest sights in the city are the main mosque built on the river by Sultan’s father Sultan Omar Ali Saifudin and the new one built by the current sultan. No gold and precious stones are saved. Mosques may also be visited by non-Muslims, but no pictures can be taken inside.

We made two interesting trips – the first in the east of the country in the Tembuong National Park, located in the basin of the river of the same name. We got there with a Brunei ship that crosses the Malaysian waters. The trip to the national park was more than enjoyable – there were two very nice young ladies, representatives of the local population – the young people.

Brunei palace

Brunei palace

We walked into the Equatorial Forest with the speedboats along the river, and from a small harbor walk down a mountain path through the woods we reached an air trail – a steel facility that allowed you to climb 40 meters high and walk through the crowns of the giant trees. You are moving in an ocean of greenery amidst the wonderful performances of the bird choir. On our way back we visited a small waterfall, under whose jets almost all our companions had bathed.

The next day we headed northwest to the oil field near the city of Serija. On the ocean, a memorial dedicated to the billion barrel of oil extracted in the state was erected. The monument is located amongst old operating and non-operating oil extraction facilities. A beautiful modern interactive museum has been built on the history of oil exploration and extraction in the area from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day. On our way back we visited a local landmark – the white sands, a stretch of ten kilometers, with a peculiar vegetation and interesting look. The days in this country have gone unnoticed.



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